SYMBIOSIS

SYMBIOSIS: INTERGEN+ BETWEEN THE YOUNG AND ELDERLY
By
Nicole Chua
Supervised By
Nur Ulfah Awatif Umairah Binti Alias
Yusra Binti ZulkifliThesis submitted to the Faculty of Engineering, Technology & Built Environment
of the UCSI University, KL Campus, in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the degree of
Master of Architecture
2018

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
DECLARATION OF ORIGINALITY AND EXCLUSIVENESSI hereby declare that the dissertation is based on my original work except for quotations and citations which have been duly acknowledged. I also declare that it has not been previously or concurrently submitted for any other degree of Master of Architecture in UCSI University or any other educational institutions.
-1651028511400
Nicole Chua
Date:

ABSTRACTMalaysia is experiencing a rapid increase in its elderly population. In 2030, there will be a paradigm demographic shift for Malaysia’s aged community. The post-war baby boomer generation of Malaysians will pass the age of 60. Based on United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNESDA) research, it is shown that in 2012 the population of Malaysia reached the age of 60 years and above, is 2.4 million people (8.3%) and rapidly increases to 8.9 million people (20.4%) in the year 2050. Malaysia will experience a profound shift in its age demographic with the elderly population increasing by two times.
It is difficult to have an integrated population throughout all age strata in a society. Especially if one considers the growing percentage of the ages population and their feeling alienated in their current physical surroundings. In order to solve imminent problems with the growing elderly population, a primary task should be considering how to improve the living condition of elderly people.
The aim of this research is to promote a new building typology for the old and young. The research study an ideal senior care residential design, which will facilitate the development of an active lifestyle environment for residents in retirement villages in Malaysia. Besides, the analysis will investigate ideas to promote social protection and public interventions to accommodate for the elderly of this nation to ensure healthy ageing and active lifestyle through qualitative approach.
This dissertation draws upon the theories related to ageing, social interaction and architecture issues. It presents various needs and issues related to the elderly to inform the architectural approach that is required to promote care for the elderly. The dissertation introduces interaction strategies by engaging the strengths of one generation to serve another generation’s needs. This will produce a functioning self-help system by bringing the youth and elderly together, a symbiotic relationship within a living complex, is where residents and local communities interact in a mutually beneficial living arrangement. Furthermore, the current care facilities, nursing homes and assisted living facilities are not socially sustainable over the long term. An improvement in the housing of elder’s community, combined with programs that promote a multi-generational interaction, can provide a comprehensive solution for the elderly population.
Hence, this thesis can be concluded by the design project, “Symbiosis: INTERGEN+ between the young and old”, as an intergenerational community hub for catalyzing intergenerational social network and allowing both young and old to achieve social, physical and psychological well-beings.

Keywords: Ageing population, retiree’s elderly living, built environment, active lifestyle, urban area, Malaysia

Table of ContentPage
TOC o “1-3” u ACKNOWLEDGEMENT PAGEREF _Toc527107337 h i
DECLARATION OF ORIGINALITY AND EXCLUSIVENESS PAGEREF _Toc527107338 h ii
ABSTRACT PAGEREF _Toc527107339 h iii
Table of Content PAGEREF _Toc527107340 h iv
LIST OF TABLES PAGEREF _Toc527107341 h v
LIST OF FIGURES PAGEREF _Toc527107342 h vi
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS PAGEREF _Toc527107343 h vii
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS & SYMBOLS PAGEREF _Toc527107344 h viii
PART ONE: BACKGROUND RESEARCH PAGEREF _Toc527107345 h 1

LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF FIGURES
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS & SYMBOLS
PART ONE: BACKGROUND RESEARCH
CHAPTER 1INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTIONThe main objective of this research is to document the determinant of the ageing population facing in existence in Malaysia. The research seeks to identify the issue is presented to described the determinant of the young elderly facing in existence throughout the period mentioned.

Secondly, the data is collected
Elderly -> intergrated youth and elderly -> architecturePopulation ageing is a global phenomenon, which has major consequences and affects all aspects of human life. The number of people over the age of 60 is projected to increase by 2050 to 2 billion worldwide. While the world has increasingly learned to sustain long life, this longevity presents many new challenges that will require cooperative planning by the world’s nation. The statistics according to United Nations is evident that the population retiring or those in retirement may face impact of slower growth, higher cost of living and the need to invest for longer post-retirement life.

The growing number of older adults is more evident in the developed countries and less evident in the developing countries. Based on Department of Statistics Malaysia, in 2050, the world population is estimated to rise to within the range of 8 to 9.6 billion. The ageing population can certainly be perceived as a major demographic challenge in this nation within the next fifty years. Its implications on socioeconomic systems, such as public pension programs, healthcare or kinship structures are likely to be substantial. Indeed, the ageing population has increased quickly to become one of the major challenges worldwide.
In Malaysian context, the ageing population has reached 28.3 million in 2010 and is expected to increase to 38.6 million in the following 30 years. This demographic milestone is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. Malaysian Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad in conjunction with the Ageing, Learning ; Technology Conference 2018, quoted that, “Normally old people’s families like to leave old people in homes and all that. It’s not very good for the old people but we need to have some facilities to take care of old people especially when they cannot function well, they become senile and all that. So, these are big issues that need to be tackled systematically.” Consequently, it is substantial to increase public awareness, construct the required infrastructure and maintain various facilities to cater for the aged population of Malaysians.
There are community-wide and personal strategies to combatting ageism, i.e. home sharing and cohousing each offer concepts that can be utilized in intergenerational living because of their housing infrastructure. The relationship between young and elderly housing residents is unique because both groups are experiencing a season of life with common characteristics. Scholars are finding growing evidence that engaging younger generations with the older generation has the most social impact of un-retirement will help reshaping how younger generations rethink about ageism.
This thesis demonstrates an approach to design prepositions on intergenerational living programs to develop an integrated age care system and independent living facilities to serve the strong demand for elderly independent living. The location of the elderly living is projected to be an urban retirement village in Subang Jaya, Malaysia, that specifically caters to people over 60 years of age. The site selected is approximately 4-acre site on Sunway City, beside Sunway Geo Tower building. The community shall cater to people of all age groups with residence reserved to retiree elderly community in which the design for the elderly community shall be focused on creating opportunities for socialization and interaction.
Background of Study
Population ageing is a global phenomenon, which has major consequences and affects all aspects of human life. The number of people over the age of 60 is projected to increase by 2050 to 2 billion worldwide. While the world has increasingly learned to sustain long life, this longevity presents many new challenges that will require cooperative planning by the world’s nation. The statistics according to United Nations is evident that the population retiring or those in retirement may face impact of slower growth, higher cost of living and the need to invest for longer post-retirement life.

The growing number of older adults is more evident in the developed countries and less evident in the developing countries. Based on Department of Statistics Malaysia, in 2050, the world population is estimated to rise to within the range of 8 to 9.6 billion. The ageing population can certainly be perceived as a major demographic challenge in this nation within the next fifty years. Its implications on socioeconomic systems, such as public pension programs, healthcare or kinship structures are likely to be substantial. Indeed, the ageing population has increased quickly to become one of the major challenges worldwide.
In Malaysian context, the ageing population has reached 28.3 million in 2010 and is expected to increase to 38.6 million in the following 30 years. This demographic milestone is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. Malaysian Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad in conjunction with the Ageing, Learning & Technology Conference 2018, quoted that, “Normally old people’s families like to leave old people in homes and all that. It’s not very good for the old people but we need to have some facilities to take care of old people especially when they cannot function well, they become senile and all that. So, these are big issues that need to be tackled systematically.” Consequently, it is substantial to increase public awareness, construct the required infrastructure and maintain various facilities to cater for the aged population of Malaysians.
There are community-wide and personal strategies to combatting ageism, i.e. home sharing and cohousing each offer concepts that can be utilized in intergenerational living because of their housing infrastructure. The relationship between young and elderly housing residents is unique because both groups are experiencing a season of life with common characteristics. Scholars are finding growing evidence that engaging younger generations with the older generation has the most social impact of un-retirement will help reshaping how younger generations rethink about ageism.
Malaysia was regarded as an ‘Ageing Nation’ when the ageing population reached 1.8 million by year 2005. In view of this changing trend, Malaysia has formulated policies and initiated programs to meet the needs and demands of its elderly population. Besides, Malaysia has participated and contributed to local and international collaborations towards improving elderly’ well-being:
The Care Centre Act 1993
The Care Centre Regulation 1994 to protect elderly in Malaysia
Private Health Care Facilities and Services Act 1998
The National Policy for the Elderly formulated in 1995 aimed at:
“To establish a society of the elderly, who are contented, dignified, possessed of a high sense of self-worth, and optimizing their potential, as well as to ensure that they enjoy all opportunities besides being given the care and protection as members of a family, society and the nation”
The 10th Malaysia Plan (MP), (2011-2015) thrust 4 number 2 ? Increasing health awareness and promotion of healthy lifestyle”
These initiatives and collaborations represent current prepositions to promote healthy ageing. However, Malaysia will face a major challenge as it must provide the necessary services and structure to support its elderly population wellbeing.
The ageing population in Malaysia has been a topic to discussion since the 1960s. Over the past 50 years, a great deal of literature has been published to evaluate policies and initiatives to help the country tide through the ‘silver tsunami’.

Problem StatementThe following issue direct the research problem:
The increasing of number of young elderly in Malaysia.

Elderly withdrawal from society
Elderly loss of power, status and identity in society
Elderly lack of engagement with community
Elderly lack of interaction with outdoor environment
Lack of living environment for elderly